An occupied Stage always requires more time and care than a vacant, because we are dealing with a homeowner’s personal items.

Here are eight tips to help you get organized and prepared for an Occupied Staging Setup:

  1. Take photos of the home before you Stage, not only to show off your “after” work, but to have as a practical reference point throughout the Stage.

  2. Create a list to identify any pieces of furniture that will be difficult to relocate and get these situated first. This will help you avoid unnecessary furniture traffic, allowing you to put all of your focus and concentration on your main purpose: Staging.

  3. Be sure the homeowner has signed a release, so you are protected and free of liability. This should be in a prepared contract, along with other signed paperwork and optional payment from the seller. If a second party, such as your agent team or someone other than the owner, is paying for the service, it is still vital that you have paperwork signed by the homeowner to release you of liability.

  4. Depending on the size of the house, be sure to secure proper help and bring all the tools necessary to complete the service. This may include another person (or two) to assist you, your Smart Staging kit, step ladders, and extra props.

  5. Set up convenient and reliable access to the home prior to arrival. You do not want to waste time waiting on someone to let you into a home. Remember, time is money.

  6. When communicating with the seller, ask specific questions. Is there anything they do not want to be moved? Where would they like placement of items not used during Staging?

  7. Be mindful when using soft goods, such as towels, sheets and bedding. There should be a clause in the paperwork identifying the seller as the responsible party for any damages of items owned by the company in their home for display during the selling process. One option is to have the seller purchase any soft goods for the occupied Staging process.

  8. Make sure company items are well documented and detailed pictures are taken, along with marking or tagging all items, so you can easily identify them during the destaging process. This will be extremely helpful, especially if you are not able to be present during the destage. You don’t want anyone walking away with the homeowner’s items, accidentally! (It’s happened!)

Do you have any other tips to abide by for an occupied Staging? We’d love to hear them!

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Mastering the Occupied Stage
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An occupied Stage always requires more time and care than a vacant, because we are dealing with a homeowner’s personal items. Here are eight tips to help you get organized and prepared for an Occupied Staging Setup.
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